© 2017 Taylor-Green SPCA

We know that sometimes it’s just not possible to keep a pet.
But before making the decision to surrender a pet, please consider all of your options.   
Go to our   Pet Care and Training page  for information on a wide range of pet issues.
 
Many problems can be improved by having your pet spayed or neutered. 
 
If you must surrender a pet, please follow the advice below.

Do’s and Dont's

If you have to give up your pet, please do the right thing:

DON’T drop your pet off in the woods or countryside, assuming that it can take care of itself. Pets lack the skills to survive on their own and may die of starvation or injury.

DON’T abandon your pet in a house or apartment you are moving out of, thinking that someone will eventually find it. This doesn’t always happen.

DON’T give your pet away to a stranger. You don’t know if that person is a responsible owner or even honest. Pets that end up in the wrong hands may be abused or sold to research laboratories.

DO try to place your pet with a trusted family member or friend, one who you are confident will love and care for your pet properly and will keep you informed of its welfare. Be sure the friend or relative understands the commitment of time and resources your pet requires and that they would like the pet because it will be a good fit for their home. Shelters receive many pets from people who knew the previous owners and wanted to help them by taking in a pet, but who did so without realizing the efforts involved in keeping the animal.

Other resources include   Get Your Pet, an online community that directly connects people who need to give up a pet with people who want to adopt or Rehome available through the link below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have tried all other options and have decided to surrender your pet, we are here to help.  We will ask you to fill out a “personality profile”     (Owner Surrender Form) about your pet below. The information about its health, behavior, habits, likes, and dislikes is really helpful to people considering your pet for adoption and helps us decide what kind of home would be best for it.  Please be honest when answering these questions; let us know if your pet has a history of biting, refuses to use the litter box, has a serious or chronic medical condition, or any other problem. It is unfair to pass on severe behavioral or medical issues to another family without their knowledge.

It is extremely important for you to obtain your animal’s medical records and supply them as well, if available.    A lack of medical information can delay the time it takes to evaluate your pet, and thus delay its availability for adoption.

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